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Former President Bill Clinton campaigns on behalf of the current president in Green Bay Friday. It's Clinton's speech at 8 tonight on the UW-Green Bay campus will be his first visit to northeastern Wisconsin since 1996 when he was running for re-election.
He'll speak on behalf of President Barack Obama. A St. Norbert College Political Scientist, Wendy Scattergood, says it's a sign the race in Wisconsin between Obama and Mitt Romney is heating up, "Wisconsin and our ten electoral votes could actually really make the difference."
In contrast to Clinton's role as a campaign surrogate, former President George W. Bush has not been enlisted by Romney. Scattergood says Clinton is still popular especially among Democrats, "He's a good speaker, he's very articulate about it. And because the economy was good during his time period. So the more you can sort of ride that coattail the better. And that's another sort of reason for the distancing in the Republican...

A debate sponsored by a pro-mining business group in Ashland this week heard from the two candidates running for the 74th Assembly District.
Legislation to change the state permitting process for iron ore mining failed by one vote in the Wisconsin Senate back in March. Democratic State Rep. Janet Bewley of Ashland is seeking re-election to her second term in the district where proposed mining in the Penokee Range is hotly contested, “The question is not, ‘Why did I vote against the bill?’ The question is, ‘Why would anyone want me to vote for it?’”
Bewley says the Assembly mining bill went beyond streamlining the iron ore mining permitting process and put the environment at risk. Republican challenger John Sendra of Mercer disagrees, “In order to clear the way for a successful mining bill, you have to get people who are proactive in mining. The only way to do that is you got to vote them into office....

The campaigns for Democrat Tammy Baldwin and Republican Tommy Thompson stayed on the attack Thursday, ahead of the second U.S. Senate debate in Wausau. Thompson got a hand from Republican U.S. Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham, who went after Baldwin for her votes against sanctions against Iran.
Baldwin voted yes on the most recent round of sanctions against Iran, and she also supported various other sanctions going back to 2001. But she voted against other sanctions in between, saying they would do little to hurt the government but would do much damage to the Iranian people.
Flanked by Thompson and Sen. Graham, Sen. McCain told reporters the no votes signaled that Baldwin did not grasp the seriousness of the Iranian nuclear threat, "When you vote against sanctions on Iran, that's not on the fringe, that's over the edge. That's over the edge."
Baldwin's campaign has said previously that she has a long record of supporting sanctions....

Here and Now

Here and Now reviews Thursday night’s U.S. Senate debate between Republican Tommy Thompson and Democrat Tammy Baldwin.

Here and Now

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse political science professor Tim Dale offers his analysis on the second U.S. Senate debate of the campaign.

Here and Now

Anchor Frederica Freyburg sits down for in-depth interviews with the two major candidates in Wisconsin’s 7th Congressional District race, Republican U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy and Democrat Pat Kreitlow.

Republican Tommy Thompson and Democrat Tammy Baldwin clashed over President Obama's health care overhaul law, the future of Medicaid, and other matters in a debate last night in Wausau.  Thompson accusing Democrat Baldwin of wanting a government takeover of health care.
"She does not believe that Obamacare went far enough.," he said.  "She said it many times.  She wants the federal government, ladies and gentlemen,  to run your health care program.  Now, I don't think anybody in America would like to see us take the same kind of program that Canada has and run it."
Baldwin accused Thompson of wanting to do away with Medicare, referring to  the Republican's own words at a campaign event.
"It's a program that I think isn't just a program, but it's a promise, and one that I vow to keep," she said.   "We need to strengthen and extend the solvency of Medicare, not voucherize it or do away with it...

WPR: The Joy Cardin Show

St. Norbert College political science professor Charley Jacobs analyzes the second U.S. Senate debate in Wisconsin. He'll discuss the performances of former Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson and Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin and get your take on the debate.

WPR: The Joy Cardin Show

St. Norbert College political science professor Charley Jacobs analyzes the second U.S. Senate debate in Wisconsin. He'll discuss the performances of former Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson and Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin and get your take on the debate.

On a cloudy, misty afternoon on the Lac du Flambeau reservation, Matt Dannenberg and Adrian King stopped people outside the Ojibwe Market as they left the store.
Dannenberg is the Central Wisconsin Organizer for the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters, which is running the Pow Wow the Vote program. It’s a nonpartisan state campaign aimed at getting 50% of Native Americans to vote in November. Dannenberg says the Native ethnicity is the least likely to vote in presidential elections, with a typical voter turnout of around 38%.
He hopes his work will have an impact this during the upcoming election. ”When they realize that this is a buzz and they can actually do things that matter and that their voice counts. They’re going to take that action,” he said.
After trying to stop several people outside the market, one who was leaving the market with soup and crackers finally answered Dannenberg’s question.
"Do you plan on...

Voters in Lac du Flambeau who live on the reservation plan to vote for President Obama, if they are going to vote at all. That wasn’t true for those at the Lake of the Torches casino who were either on vacation visiting the area or gambling. 
These photos are part of Wisconsin Public Radio's Road to November series. Reporters Maureen McCollum and Lindsey Moon are traveling north along Highway 51 talking to voters about the election all this week. What issue is most important to you? Find updates from the road on WPRNews' Facebook page.

It’s nothing new that Native American voter turnout is low, but some members of Wisconsin’s 11 Native American tribes are working to change that.
Adrian King is one of them.
He’s a member of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and says he stayed away from politics until last winter. But Republican lawmakers' support for new state laws that would have streamlined permitting for iron ore mining in northern Wisconsin changed that.
For King, environmental issues are one of his biggest concerns this election season.
“There are these responsibilities that some of us have,” he explained. King believes it is his duty to make sure the land is maintained; he cares deeply for the wild rice beds in and around Lac du Flambeau.
This election season, he’s been volunteering with Matt Dannenberg of PowWow the Vote, going door to door on the reservation asking residents to commit to voting in November.
...

Thursday was a bustling morning at the Ojibwe Market in Lac du Flambeau. Joe Walker was busy.
He’s the head baker and doubles as a cook in the deli. He says the broasted chicken is a local favorite. Preparing enough of that for the day, in addition to the homemade éclairs and cream puffs the market is known for, keeps him on his toes.
Like many residents of Wisconsin’s Sovereign Nations, Walker says he won’t be voting this election season.
“I’ve just had enough of all of it,” he said. “I don’t really trust or like either candidate.”
Walker isn’t a member of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, but he has lived on the reservation for more than a decade. He says a lot of people in the area don't think their vote matters. He is one of them.
In order to convince Walker to vote, he says it would take...

WPR: At Issue with Ben Merens

Psychologist Frank Farley talks about two psychological issues in the news. What kind of person takes risks-like running for president? And then at 4:30, how we can we deal with election-related stress?

WPR: At Issue with Ben Merens

Psychologist Frank Farley talks about two psychological issues in the news. What kind of person takes risks-like running for president? And then at 4:30, how we can we deal with election-related stress?

The latest poll by Marquette University shows a virtual tie between President Obama and Mitt Romney in the race for Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes. 
The last two times Marquette polled likely voters in Wisconsin it found President Obama with a double-digit lead. Marquette pollster Charles Franklin says all that has changed with this latest survey which gives President Obama a 49-48 percent lead over Mitt Romney, "And that really needs to be seen as a tie.  They're separated by fractions of a percentage point. It's not quite a full percentage point between them."
Put another way, if you look at the entire sample of 870 likely voters in this survey, the President leads Romney by a grand total of four voters.
The poll was taken before last night's presidential debate but after the first debate. Romney's numbers improved on multiple measures. He actually picked up support from Republicans. And Franklin says Romney now leads among self-identified Independent...

The latest Marquette University poll shows a virtual tie in Wisconsin's U.S. Senate race between Republican Tommy Thompson and Democrat Tammy Baldwin. The survey comes as the two candidates prepare for their second debate tonight in Wausau.
The last two Marquette surveys showed leads of nine and four points for Baldwin, but the poll released Wednesday had Thompson up by one point.  Marquette Pollster Charles Franklin says the race is actually a tie. Of the 870 likely voters surveyed, Thompson edged Baldwin by a total of just three voters.
Nearly half of voters viewed Baldwin unfavorably--up several points from the last Marquette survey. And half viewed Thompson unfavorably. Franklin says it's a reflection of the political ad war on television where nearly all commercials have been negative, "I think it's far too early to judge where this campaign will end up.  But it's certainly appropriate to recognize that the negativity of this campaign has taken its toll on...

Two small businessmen with very different ideas on the nation's debt and health care are running for Tammy Baldwin's congressional seat. Chad Lee and Mark Pocan spoke at the downtown Madison Rotary Wednesday.
The 2nd Congressional District in south-central Wisconsin is overwhelmingly Democratic, but went Republican with the election of moderate Scott Klug in 1990. The Republican running this year is Chad Lee. He’s up against longtime state legislator Mark Pocan, a Democrat who touted his ability to work across party lines at a time Congressional approval is 10-percent, "The only way you're going to get something done is to work with other people. I've had a reputation for that. I've got friendships on the other side of the aisle."
 
Pocan supports the Affordable Care Act. Lee does not. The Republican says it fails to address cost concerns adequately and doesn't provide portability, "We haven't allowed people portability. We live in an age where people change...

WPT Presents

U.S. Senate candidates Tammy Baldwin and Tommy Thompson meet in Wausau for the second of three televised debates. Hosted by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Wisconsin Public Radio and Wisconsin Public Television.

Like many communities in Wisconsin, Merrill was hit hard by the recession. The area’s paper mills, and door and window manufacturers are still recovering.  The economy often dominates political conversation.
Wednesday, a group of men met at the Village Tree for coffee, pancakes or Mountain Dew. They meet almost everyday to talk politics, sports, and other important things, like town gossip. They talked about jobs and the economy in the local community, but they also brought up another matter that hasn’t received a lot of attention – immigration.
Usually during political discussion they tend agree to disagree because they’re such good friends, and because differing opinions make for better conversation. They did all agree that Mexican immigrants are important to the local manufacturing and dairy industries.
When asked about immigration, retired high school history teacher and Governor Romney supporter Garth Swanson says it’s not a big issue. "I think they integrate well in the communities. Most of...

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